Triggered? Here’s Something You Can Do

We all know what it feels like to be triggered. Triggered by something someone says. Or does. Or by something we read in the news, or on social media. For some of us, sometimes all it takes is a song on the radio to trigger a round of tears. Or, the sight of a particular […]

Triggered? Here’s Something You Can Do

We all know what it feels like to be triggered. Triggered by something someone says. Or does. Or by something we read in the news, or on social media. For some of us, sometimes all it takes is a song on the radio to trigger a round of tears. Or, the sight of a particular person to send us spiraling into anger.

Usually when we feel triggered, we’re being reminded of something from our past. In other words, we experience the same feelings as we did during a similar event(s) in the past. It’s easy to blame our triggers on whatever is in front of us. However, though our current situation might feel awful, it’s when we shine a light on our subconscious wounds, that we begin to eliminate our triggers.

What’s important to realize, is that when we are triggered, whether with anger, sadness, or fear, we are essentially disempowered. We’re less able to think, or speak, clearly. And, we’re more likely to react impulsively, and in ways we might later regret.

The goal is to help deactivate the triggers, so that we can face unpleasant, challenging, situations more effectively.

So, how do we do this?

Pause. Notice what you’re feeling. And take a breath.

When you feel triggered, pause to notice what you’re feeling. Slow your breath. Begin breathing deeply from your belly. Slow, deep, breathing turns on the relaxation response.

Next, while breathing deeply, tune into what you’re feeling, and use your fingers to tap on the fleshy side of your hand. (It doesn’t matter which hand.) This tapping will help you interrupt your automatic trigger reaction. In addition, tapping helps to reduce cortisol, reduce the intensity of the feeling, and bring blood back to your brain.

All of this makes your brain more effective, and helps you feel better – enabling you to handle your situation in a more powerful way.

It’s simple. By pausing, and interrupting your reaction, you will be more able to respond consciously, rather than unconsciously.

Because our triggers typically stem from painful events, they can actually lead us to the places we most need to heal. If you struggle with strong triggers, reach out for professional guidance to learn how to manage them.

When life feels challenging, it’s easy to get triggered. Have compassion for yourself. Take extra good care of yourself.

Wishing You Peace and Wellbeing,

Marian

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