Story of Hope

FORMER Witness and award-winning journalist Nivashni Nair-Sukdhev has written the first of many books to come (one hopes). It is a personal account that tells of the remarkable nexus between faith and science leading to triumph over seemingly insurmountable odds. This book is not a self-help book on how to make babies. Got it! Instead […]



FORMER Witness and award-winning journalist Nivashni Nair-Sukdhev has written the first of many books to come (one hopes).
It is a personal account that tells of the remarkable nexus between faith and science leading to triumph over seemingly insurmountable odds.
This book is not a self-help book on how to make babies. Got it! Instead it’s a play on Facebook’s daily question to prod you to post: “What’s on your mind?”
She has with wit, and rare wisdom, cleverly transcribed a digital social-media diary into the traditional medium of a book. On the surface, it is about infertility and the leading cause thereof, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS).
While it can be considered an official PCOS campaign manuscript, it isn’t a textbook or a medical journal article, but, instead, part memoir and part romantic adventure.
Mostly, however, it is a story of hope, love and heartache. Nair Sukdhev shares the beautiful story of her upbringing in the sleepy hollow of the city of Pietermaritzburg, overlaid with her romantic misadventures in Durban and her 12-day whirlwind romance. No spoiler alert.
We are transported at a breakneck pace from her beautiful upbringing to her desire acquired in adulthood to make babies: now.
She readily admits that she never imagined herself as a mother. All she ever wanted as a child was to look after her loving parents in old age, and in between write and tell the stories of the less powerful.
Little did she know that she would tell the story of her own life, dogged by heartache, sustained by hope, leading ultimately to triumph against PCOS.
This is an important book and a timely one considering that September is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Awareness Month.
The book teaches readers about infertility and extends the narrative beyond the concept of being “barren” and considered by society as a failure.
It affirms the importance of seeking and sharing knowledge, of creating a support network, and of faith. Hope runs through the pages of the book. Most importantly, it reaffirms the importance of good science over the old wives’ tale of garlic and lemon being a cure for all.
The strength of Nair-Sukdhev’s story is that the writing is vivacious, the tone entertaining and the pace just right.
This is good literature in all respects and comes complete with entertaining love stories, novel digital solidarity, heroes, villains and a life-affirming happy ending.
She conquered PCOS and has a three-year-old-boy, Riav, to prove it. Today she is an excellent ambassador working against the stigma associated with infertility. It is relatable story, likely to help many couples to conquer infertility and live happily ever after.

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