Is Your Child Involved in Bullying? Here’s What You Can Do

It’s never simple to hear that your kid has been associated with bullying. You can never imagine that your child would deliberately try to harm and dominate another individual, specifically in the context of an imbalance of power. What makes things even more intricate today is that bullying has gone beyond physical and verbal harassment […]

Is Your Child Involved in Bullying? Here’s What You Can Do

It’s never simple to hear that your kid has been associated with bullying. You can never imagine that your child would deliberately try to harm and dominate another individual, specifically in the context of an imbalance of power. What makes things even more intricate today is that bullying has gone beyond physical and verbal harassment into the realm of technology. What should one do when challenged with the truth that their kid has been indulging in bullying behaviour?

Here’s an action by step guide on how to progress from here.

Action 1: Acknowledge
Take a breath and be calm so you can be receptive to what you have actually heard. Request more details, and try to process what you’re hearing as carefully as possible. Do not try and move the blame or validate your kid’s behaviour prior to you know more. Get the contact details of the parent or instructor who notified you of the situation so that you can follow up with them later, and thank them for bringing the matter to your notification.

Step 2: Attempt to understand
You know your kid much better than any person else. Try and comprehend why they would turn to such behaviour. Research shows that bullying is frequently a sign of a low empathy or low self-confidence, the expression of anger or a requirement to be in control or simply a method to impress peers or imitate relative. It might also be brought on by inadequate adult attention or discipline. Ask yourself honestly what the source of your kid’s behaviour might be. There’s likewise an opportunity that the scenario was misinterpreted or your child was simply attempting to protect themselves, but don’t utilize it as an excuse.

Action 3: Talk it out
Take A Seat with your child and inform them what you have heard. Let them know that this is a serious matter, and you want to hear their side of the story. If it turns out the complaint was not a misconception, explain to your child the repercussions of their behaviour – particularly on the target of their bullying. Assist them develop better strategies to handle dispute. Teach them much better social abilities and responsible decision making.

Action 4: Set down new borders
Make your expectations of your child extremely clear. Develop clear and consistent effects for bullying behaviour. Let them understand that if they’re having difficulty, they must approach an instructor or you rather than taking matters into their own hands. Let other relative understand that they have to set a better example by avoiding chatter in your home and modelling non-violent behaviour.

Step 5: Follow up
Find out from instructors if your talk has translated into a modification in your kid’s behaviour at school. Applaud your kid when they reveal compassion for others. If the behaviour does not stop, look for counselling for your child as quickly as possible.

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