How to Teach Kids About Setting Goals

It is essential for everybody to set goals in life. It can become a fun and easy process for a lifetime if kids are taught goal setting at an early stage. This is the reason why several schools consider goal setting exercises at the very commencement of the term, followed by carrying out reviews on […]

How to Teach Kids About Setting Goals

It is essential for everybody to set goals in life. It can become a fun and easy process for a lifetime if kids are taught goal setting at an early stage. This is the reason why several schools consider goal setting exercises at the very commencement of the term, followed by carrying out reviews on a periodic basis.

Kids simply have a vague idea about setting goals. They mainly focus on extrinsic rewards such as pleasing their parents. They need to be offered a project which makes them work on accomplishing something personal, involving aspects of health such as the social, emotional, mental and physical.

Set smart goals

A goal needs to be measurable, specific, realistic and timely in order to be effective. Kids prefer generalizing when it comes to goal setting. For example, one may want to be the best basketball player in the team. How is a goal like this measured? What exactly does a goal like this mean? You need to ask them to be specific. Begin with scoring two baskets in each game (or however many; just set something measurable!). With a goal like this, they can continuously push the barriers to accomplish greater goals.

Set goals that are not based on circumstance

For instance, asking your child not to be mad at their younger sibling is not a measurable goal. This appears to be more connected to an emotional response to a sibling. If you want the goals to be effective, the entire goal-setting process needs to be done in a positive manner. Ask them to spend 30 minutes with their sibling every day after school. Spending time with each other will help them bond.

Write down goals

This tip is backed by science as well. Recent studies show that when goals are written down, the individual is likely to achieve them.

Confronting goals that are not realistic

Kids have the habit of choosing goals that just seems impossible to achieve. You need to teach them the concepts of short and long-term goals. You need to give your child reality checks; for example, if your child is allergic to cats and wants to have one as a pet. If your child considers the NBA as his goal, help him set goals that are age-appropriate and attainable.

Set up review points

You can teach your kid to use poster boards for mapping their goals. Ask them to write their main goal on the top of the poster. Ask them to mention the steps they would take for attaining their goal. Ask them to track their progress once a week or month. It is crucial to help your children have their own checkpoint systems. Help them develop a system that actually works for them.

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