Ancient and Recent Proof You Can Kill Ideas

Folks state you can’t eliminate a concept. However concepts die all the time, both from natural causes and murder. An example of ideaicide: Do you keep in mind back in 2014 or so, what the hot-button political problem was? Sure, groups of all kinds were talking about all the normal things. Healthcare, defence, social security, […]

Ancient and Recent Proof You Can Kill Ideas

Folks state you can’t eliminate a concept.

However concepts die all the time, both from natural causes and murder.

An example of ideaicide:

Do you keep in mind back in 2014 or so, what the hot-button political problem was? Sure, groups of all kinds were talking about all the normal things. Healthcare, defence, social security, racism, corruption …

However you could not go a day without somebody discussing income inequality.

Everyone compared graphs of this to charts of that. The Occupy movement had actually stimulated attention and everything settled on this.

Then Trump chose to run for president. Certainly, that’s a difficult concern for any billionaire – however especially that billionaire – to browse. So, rather, he discussed developing ‘a big, beautiful wall’.

Boom. All of a sudden the topic du jour was migration.

Chalk it up to luck or ability, mass manipulation or a concept whose time had come. In either case, the old idea was dead – or a minimum of bleeding out.

Want a more extensive example?

Well, I can’t provide one. How could I? If a concept is dead, then I do not understand about it.

However I can indicate a wonderfully intriguing anti-example, which so occurs to be among the most recent points of political fixation:

China.

If you look at Chinese history, it looks like an unlimited stream of development. The pertinent Wikipedia short article includes hundreds of developments – at the top, it discusses the “Four Excellent Inventions”: paper, compasses, gunpowder and the printing press.

These alone are amazing accomplishments of science – and China created them in ancient history. What other country can boast a history like that?

Much better question: how did they handle that?

Hereditary superiority? Unlikely.

A culture that favours innovation? Hardly. Chinese society, then and now, hardly welcomes extreme and deviant thinking.

I have a theory.

And my theory discusses why China invented these things however didn’t, you know, use them.

Not to bring up a sore point for them, however the Century of Embarrassment involved an alliance of Western powers sculpting up China. They did this, in part, thanks to their exceptional innovation. It was ‘exceptional’ because European navies had compasses for browsing and plenty of cannons – using, wait for it, gunpowder.

Industrial-age Europe utilized the very same tech invented in ancient China … so how could it potentially transcend?

My theory is easy:

China has, for most of its history, been politically stable. Sure, sure, dynasties ended bloody, they got gotten into a couple of times, then there was that mess with the Cultural Revolution.

But take a look at any corner of the world over countless years. Most other cultures broke down and built up again dozens of times.

Today, the buzzword is ‘interruption!’ Back then, it was ‘stability!’ Industries remained the same for centuries, in contrast to today’s tech churn, so stability have you an edge.

Since, at that time, possibly new inventions occurred every few years, through dumb luck or inspiration.

But without a steady system of trade, that idea would not leave the town.

And without strong guideline of law, that village would quickly end up being fodder for bandits sooner or later.

So a politically sound society could build up and share its inventions, whereas other societies would lose them to entropy.

However if it’s too steady, then it’ll struggle to use those innovations.

In Europe, the printing press was a gamechanger. In ancient China, it probably simply strengthened the existing video game.

Maybe I’m right, perhaps not. At best, it’s a partial explanation … though it fits the facts nicely.

( Even if it has horrific implications – most of our good concepts have been lost to time.)

However let’s assume it holds true.

You can be darn sure I’m gon na use this as a metaphor.

It’s a call for you to welcome chaos and regular, due to the fact that excessive of either stifles you.

And a suggestion that absolutely nothing is long-term.

But the huge one?

You have many great concepts – many solutions to the challenges you face. They won’t do you a lick of great by themselves.

Gunpowder as a novelty today is less useful than gunpowder as a weapon a thousand years from now.

Find out how to act on your concepts and instincts. Anything else is like letting foreign imperialists carve their initials on your back.

biggsob-20
US